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Chance the Rapper Donates $1 Million to Chicago Public Schools

Chance the Rapper meets with governor after Twitter exchange

Chance the Rapper on Monday announced that he will donate $1 million to Chicago Public Schools.

"Our kids should not be held hostage", he said, noting that CPS has stated that it may have to close schools almost two weeks early due to the district's pension gap. In a press conference broadcasted on Instagram Live, the Chicago artist noted that the money comes from ticket sales for his upcoming tour. He also plans to give $10,000 to a different Chicago public school for every $100,000 raised. School funding for CPS and public schools across the state is now attached to the Illinois Senate's "grand bargain", a bipartisan budget deal comprised of a group of interdependent bills.

The city called Rauner's suggestions "no solution at all", while CPS said in a statement that Rauner's "so-called plan actually demands that Chicago students do more to get the same funding that every other student in the State of IL is entitled to receive - a gross disparity that has no place in 2017".

"This isn't about politics, this isn't about posturing, this is about taking care of the kids", he concluded, before adding, "Governor Rauner, do your job!" "[We discussed] funding [Chicago Public Schools] with that $215 million that was discussed in May of previous year, and was vetoed in December".

In addition to his initial donation, Chance called on other Chicago companies and corporations, as well as the public, to donate.

"As a private citizen, a parent, and a product of CPS, I'm asking you to fight with me", he said.

Hours before Chance's press conference, Rauner released his own plan to solve the budget crisis.

The governor's office also recommended that the city revise its TIF policy so that growth in property taxes for schools would no longer be frozen in TIF districts.

The two sat down for a highly unusual, one-on-one meeting last week to discuss CPS funding amid a two-year state budget standoff.