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Britain-EU Brexit talks to start Monday as planned

Leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party Arlene Foster and Deputy Leader Nigel Dodds arrive at 10 Downing Street in London for a meeting with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May Tuesday

Chancellor Philip Hammond said Britain should prioritise jobs and prosperity and take a "pragmatic" approach as it begins Brexit talks next week.

"Following discussions in Brussels today, both sides agreed that the formal negotiations under the Article 50 process can now start".

Hammond, speaking to reporters before a meeting of the 28 European Union finance ministers on Friday, said Britain should work closely with the bloc to prioritise jobs and prosperity when Brexit talks start next week.

Mr Davis is expected to meet Mr Barnier at the Commission's headquarters in Belgian capital Brussels on Monday but it is not known how long the initial round of talks will last.

Prime Minister Theresa May had announced that Britain would be prepared to leave Europe without a deal if necessary, with her now famous message "no deal is better than a bad deal". "It continues and when the deal is done, it will be done", a senior source in the Conservative Party said on Thursday.

The announcement was agreed on Thursday between Brexit minister David Davis and the European Commission's chief negotiator Michel Barnier, the ministry said.

After the general election fiasco, May hopes to secure the backing of the ultra-conservative Democratic Unionist Party, which would add the DUP's 10 seats to the Conservatives' 317 in the 650-member House of Commons.

Among topics that need to be agreed upon is the status of United Kingdom citizens living and working in the EU, as well as that of European nationals doing the same in Britain.

The Liberal Democrats, the fourth-biggest group in the British parliament, urged May to form a cross-party committee to negotiate Brexit.

London-based banking giant HSBC said Friday that it would keep more jobs in Britain depending on the government's approach to Brexit.

Speaking on Marr, Sir Michael said the government wanted maximum access to the European Union single market and an "arrangement on immigration".

The opening was set to take place on Monday, but was delayed due to the ongoing negotiations.

Prime Minister Theresa May in March formally notified the European Union of its intention to leave, starting a two-year timetable for negotiating the exit.

"In my experience recently, businesses that look over the garden fence have gone: "Hmm, (the) grass is not quite as dark and unforgiving as you might expect", Andrew told the BBC.