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Korea will be met with fire and fury

039;North Korea normally cries wolf but the difference now is Donald Trump', says research fellow

North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un, has expressed no interest in walking away from his nuclear and ballistic missile program, and the country has survived past sanctions.

The US calculated last month that North Korea has up to 60 nuclear weapons, the Post said, more than double most assessments by independent experts.

The Washington Post first reported that the nation had such capability, based on a Defense Intelligence Agency assessment read to the newspaper it verified with two USA officials.

"After many years of failure, countries are coming together to finally address the dangers posed by North Korea".

North Korea claimed in September that it had successfully tested the kind of nuclear warhead described in the report. According to US intelligence experts, the tests show that North Korea is close to achieving success with long-range delivery systems.

Now, North Korea has to respond.

The sanctions followed Pyongyang's two tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles last month.

"There is no bigger mistake than the United States believing that its land is safe across the ocean", the news agency said. At other times President Trump seemed to think that China could be easily induced to pressure North Korea to abandon its nuclear ambitions. As just noted, North Korea deserves most of the credit for this display of great-power unity, as its various activities and relentlessly bellicose rhetoric have alarmed its neighbors for years.

The Donald Trump administration (and its supporters) is giving itself a high-five over the passage of U.N. Security Council Resolution 2371, which imposes harsh new economic sanctions on North Korea.

North Korea, under the erratic dictatorship of Kim Jong Un, is becoming more paranoid and aggressive in its actions toward the West - particularly the United States and its allies in the Pacific Rim. In the past, loose monitoring of such "secret" exchanges allowed North Korea to evade United Nations and US -imposed economic sanctions.

Washington "is taking and will continue to take prudent defensive measures to protect ourselves and our allies" from the North Korean threat, Haley said.

A section of the latest DIA report, which was dated July 28, was read over the telephone to the Washington Post by an official.