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Donald Trump visits Florida to see Hurricane Irma devastation

Carolyn Kaster  AP

Trump returned to Texas and stopped in Louisiana on September 2 where he visited a shelter and spoke with some of those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

President Donald Trump is praising the recovery efforts in Florida before departing for the state to survey hurricane damage from Irma.

It is the third trip that Trump has made in response to a hurricane striking the southern United States.

Throughout the storms, Trump has been eager to project a high level of federal competence and to avoid pitfalls made by some of his predecessors in the face of natural disasters. "We are there for you 100 percent", he said, adding, "this is a state that I know very well".

As Trump passed out food with Pence and the first lady, people thanked them for coming and seemed more interested in selfies than sandwiches.

As Harvey bore down on Texas in late August, Trump and his aides quickly said he would visit the disaster zone within days of the storm's landfall.

Joseph Ross, left, cleans up debris from his damaged home with help from a neighbor in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Naples, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.

Trump says alongside Scott and other Florida officials that he knows "at a certain point it ends for you and we can't let it end".

In addition to severe flooding across Florida and extensive property damage in the Keys, residents faced widespread power outages that initially plunged more than half the state into darkness. More than 6.5 million homes and businesses lost electricity in Florida, and fuel shortages plagued much of the state. Another told Mr Trump that he "married well".

In the Naples and Fort Myers area, Trump received updates on recovery efforts from state and local authorities and viewed damage caused by the monster storm. Many communities are still cleaning up or without power or air conditioning. Gas stations along the way advertised that they didn't have fuel. Days after Irma passed, nearly 80 percent of homes and businesses were still without electricity, and floodwaters still covered some communities entirely.