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Trump says he plans to meet Putin during Asia tour

Independent Alliance TD John Halligan and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un

"This is a country that grew out of the total devastation of the Korean War, and over a matter of six, seven decades we've become a thriving democracy. and a thriving market economy", the foreign minister said.

North Korea's recent actions, including several missiles that overflew Japan and Pyongyang's sixth and largest nuclear test, have raised the stakes in the most critical worldwide challenge of Trump's presidency.

But Kang warned that "we need to be very careful about military options", adding that they "are there to give strength to diplomacy". The president joined Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Japan on Sunday and Monday, enjoying a casual burger lunch and golf - and discussing the nuclear crisis.

Addressing the US military personnel stationed at the Japanese air base, Trump warned "no one, no dictator, no regime. should underestimate American resolve".

The North Korean nuclear threat is expected to dominate Trump's meetings in Japan and the next two stages of his tour, South Korea and China, where he will have a highly anticipated sit-down with Chinese President Xi Jinping. "We want Putin's help on North Korea, and we'll be meeting with a lot of different leaders", Trump told reporters on Air Force One.

Trump has rattled some allies with his vow to "totally destroy" North Korea if it threatens the United States and his dismissal of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as a "rocket man" on a suicide mission.

In a conversation with journalists, the USA leader described the North Korean crisis as "a big problem" for his country and the entire world.

Trump was due to arrive early Tuesday in Seoul - where the subject of how to tackle North Korea's totalitarian dictator is expected to be at the top of the agenda.

"We want to get it solved". Russian President Vladimir Putin and his United States counterpart Donald Trump may meet at an Asian economic summit in Vietnam next week.

Some 20,000 South Koreans would die every day in the event of a US-North Korean war, according to alleged calculations made by the Pentagon.

Givens, who spent four years stationed in Korea, added that the figures did not take into account potential use of nuclear weapons by Pyongyang.

In a June article in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, the military historian Reid Kirby said the types of artillery along the demilitarized zone, and vulnerability of children and the elderly, meant that a North Korean attack using the nerve agent Sarin could kill as many as 2.5 million people in Seoul and injure millions more.

As of the announcement on Monday, South Korea had North Korea sanctions imposed on 97 individuals.

"I'm not anxious about my safety at all in North Korea, I've never experienced a safer place to be".

'There is only one way that this war ends.