stayontheblack.com

Technology

IPhone crashing? Widespread iOS date bug wreaks havoc on December 2

Google Maps iOS update adds iPhone X support

As you probably know by now, Apple was forced yesterday morning to release iOS 11.2 in order to eradicate a bug that was leading some iPhone models running iOS 11.1.2 to continuously crash in a loop.

After much investigation - courtesy of a thread on the iPhone subreddit - it appears that the issue relates to repeat time-based notifications. The bug was reported soon by the officials and the new update was soon released after realizing the issue. Apple Pay Cash feature is limited to the U.S. consumers only as the service is only available in the United States.

The update also brings support for 7.5W wireless charging for owners of the iPhone 8 and iPhone X. When those devices launched, they were limited to charging at 5W, which was the same charge rating as the wired charger. While Apple has not revealed exactly when iOS version 11.2 will be arriving, many users have speculated on what the upcoming big update will include. With all the new features inside the last update, such as the Notification Center, the unified Lock Screen, customizable Control Panel and a lot more features for iPads. Once that's done, the article says, you're good to update to iOS 11.2.

Besides that, the iOS 11.2 also fixes a problem that caused the iOS keyboard to change "it" to "I.T".

Apple has just released a new iOS 11.2 and it's rolling out as at the time of this writing.

IS iOS 11 TO BLAME?

. The second issue that's being patched with iOS 11.1.1 is related to Siri's problems to respond to vocal commands. Once your card's set up, all you have to do is open the Apple Pay app in iMessage to complete a transaction with a few simple taps.

This week has been really bad for Apple.

Once updated, return to each app in Notifications and turn all notifications back on. The nightmare started on Tuesday, after a Twitter user disclosed a critical security vulnerability for macOS High Sierra that allowed anyone with physical access to a Mac to gain system administrator privileges without even entering a password.