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This is what made the CBS board give up on Les Moonves

Story alleges a darker side of'60 Minutes

Hours after "60 Minutes" executive producer Jeff Fager claimed that his termination Wednesday stemmed from a text message he'd sent to a CBS reporter, the contents of the message were divulged by the network.

In the texts, which were sent after Duncan went for comment, Hager wrote: 'If you repeat these false accusations without any of your own reporting to back them up, you will be held responsible for harming me'. Fager said it was because of a text message he sent to a CBS News reporter who was covering the story about him.

He said Mr Fager had "violated company policy", without elaborating on how.

Two decades later, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason has a message for Les Moonves, who recently stepped down from his post as CBS President and CEO and is facing sexual harassment allegations from 12 women.

In the first New Yorker report, former colleagues also accused Mr Fager of inappropriate touching, and of protecting men accused of sexual misconduct.

Fager was sacked Wednesday over the message. They remained in their positions while law firms hired by CBS investigated the allegations.

He said he didn't think one note would have resulted in a dismissal after 36 years at the network, "but it did".

On Sunday, The New Yorker reported that a new accuser said "she "felt compelled to speak because she simply 'can't believe [Fager is] back there.'" The article described her as "a producer who was an intern at CBS" in the early 2000s who said that "he groped her at a work party". It was then decided that the former CEO's evasiveness meant he could be terminated with cause, and in the end Moonves left the network without a dime.

In July, six former CBS News employees told The New Yorker that Fager "would touch employees in ways that made them uncomfortable" after drinking at office parties.

"60 Minutes" is the most popular and powerful news broadcast on television, and Fager is only the second person to lead it during its 50 years of history.

Rhodes said that Fager's longtime No. 2, Bill Owens, will manage the newsmagazine while a search is underway "for a new executive producer of the program".

Linda Bloodworth-Thomason has a different kind of Les Moonves story, but it's as powerful as numerous others unearthed in Ronan Farrow's recent exposé about the fallen CBS chief.

Rhodes' action against Fager also exacerbated the longstanding tensions between "60 Minutes" and the rest of the news division.

Charlie Rose, who hosted the morning news show alongside Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell, was dropped from the show in November following sexual misconduct allegations.